Monday, July 24th, 2017

MDMA use in 2012

November 13, 2012 by  
Filed under MDMA, Molly

MDMA pills

“Molly” is the street name for MDMA a recreational psychoactive “club drug.” MDMA is the active ingredient in ecstasy, which usually refers to the street pill form of the drug. While ecstasy is commonly “cut” with other additives, the term “Molly” generally refers to pure MDMA.

MDMA rose to prominence in trendy nightclubs and gay dance clubs throughout the early 1980’s. From there it spread to raves and clubs across the country. In 1985 the DEA classified MDMA as a Schedule 1 controlled substance. The drug gained popularity in the 1990s rave culture. But MDMA use declined steeply in 2001 after alarmed lawmakers made the distribution of MDMA more severely punished, dose for dose, than heroin.

However, in 2006, its popularity began to rise again, and by 2008 it was estimated that 10-25 million people had tried MDMA or ecstasy at least once in the past year. MDMA use in 2012 is still prominent and there are many different reasons for that.

One of the main reasons is that MDMA in its pure form (known as “Molly”) became widely available for illicit use in the early 2000’s, which contributed to its resurgence in the drug scene. MDMA use in 2012 tends to be centered primarily on the young, with most first time users between the ages of 16 and 25. The mainstream popularity of electronic dance music also contributed to MDMA’s rising reputation.

Experts say that addiction to MDMA is rare, but the popularity of MDMA use in 2012 comes with a lot of accidental overdoses because the drug induces elevated body temperature and increased heart rate.   Those who overdose from MDMA drug abuse usually experience overheating, panic attacks, faintness, severe dehydration and loss of consciousness. Some people who have died from MDMA drug abuse have had body temps over 108 degrees.

MDMA use in 2012-Legitamite medical usage

Only recently have scientists been given permission to explore the use of MDMA for medical use. This is because, for a long time, people believed that MDMA was a lot more hazardous than it actually is. In September 2002, an article by scientist George Ricaurte was published in Science magazine. The article outlined the severe neurotoxic of MDMA on dopaminergic neurons, producing what looked like “holes” in the brain and causing Parkinson’s-like symptoms in users. The report spread like wildfire, being cited in a number of media publications.

However, the article was later retracted, with scientists admitting that the monkeys were given methamphetamines, not MDMA, and the journal was criticized for publishing an article that was clearly meant to be used as a political scare tactic. Unfortunately, the retraction did not garner as much publicity as the original article, so many in the general public still believe that MDMA will “eat holes in your brain.”

After the article was retracted, MDMA was approved for human research. There is evidence that MDMA will be useful in treating post-traumatic stress syndrome, depression, and even Parkinson’s-the disease that it was once thought to cause. MDMA use in 2012 could very well include use for legitimate medical purposes.

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