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Is Molly An Opiate?

February 19, 2013 by  
Filed under Molly, Opiate

Is Molly An Opiate?

Is Molly An Opiate?

Molly is not an opiate. Opiates are narcotics that are derived from the opium poppy plant. . Heroin, narcotic prescription painkillers (morphine, oxycodone, Vicodin, etc.), and opium are all considered opiates. Molly is the street name of the drug MDMA. MDMA has the full chemical name of ‘3, 4 Methylene-dioxy-N-methylamphetamine’ or ‘Methylenedioxymethamphetamine’. Unlike Ecstasy, which has a reputation for being laced with everything from caffeine to methamphetamine, molly — a name shortened from “molecule” — is thought of as “pure” MDMA.

Is Molly An Opiate? Similarities

Molly is not an opiate, but they do have some similar characteristics. They are both drugs of abuse. Abuse of opiates and/or molly triggers the “reward pathway” in the brain. This is the pathway that is activated when something good happens normally- exercise, sex, and chocolate can all trigger this pathway. Drugs of abuse cause an extreme reaction in this pathway, causing an overproduction of so-called “pleasure chemicals” in the brain. Over time, the pathway adapts to the constant influx of these chemicals. It stops producing as many chemicals in response to the drugs (and any other pleasurable event) and the reward pathway also becomes less responsive to the chemicals. When the drugs are stopped or significantly reduced, the individual experiences depression, anxiety, and drug craving.

Overdose of both Molly and opiates can result in death, especially when combined with other drugs. Death from Molly is usually due to hyperthermia, or overheating. Sometimes Molly related deaths are due to accidents while on Molly, due to Molly’s hallucinogenic effect. Opiates usually cause death by decreasing respiratory function to the point that someone can’t take in enough oxygen.

Is Molly An Opiate? Differences

Molly is not an opiate, and there are several differences between molly and opiates. For one, opiates are powerfully physically addictive. When someone takes opiates for a long period of time, they develop a tolerance to opiates. This means it takes more of the drug to produce the same effect. When use is stopped, the person experiences physical withdrawal symptoms. Withdrawal from opiates can be very painful and can include nausea, vomiting, muscle aches, insomnia, restless leg syndrome, sneezing, and runny nose. Tolerance to Molly can develop, but physical withdrawal symptoms, if they occur, are very mild in comparison. Molly’s withdrawal symptoms are more psychological and usually craving and depression occurs when use is stopped.

Differences between Ecstasy and Molly

Another reason that Molly is not an opiate is that it doesn’t have analgesic (painkilling) effects. One of the hallmarks of the opiate class of drugs is that they kill pain. Molly does not have a painkilling effect. Because of this painkilling effect, there is a legitimate medical usage for many opiates. They are often prescribed to treat moderate to severe pain. In contrast, there is currently no medical usage for Molly.

Molly is not an opiate because Molly can have hallucinogenic effects that opiates don’t normally produce. Molly use generally induces feelings of euphoria, a heightened sense of intimacy and pleasure, and decreased anxiety. Sometimes, Molly use can cause visual hallucinations and a distorted sense of time.

Pop Culture and The Glorification of Molly

2 responses to “Is Molly An Opiate?”

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